The Artist Proof Studio as a Model for Training and Developing Africa’s Future Engineers, Technicians and Artisans

  • Mark L Gordon Gauteng Department of Health – Infrastructure Management Unit & UNISA – Department of Electrical and Mining Engineering, South Africa
Keywords: APS Business Model, Alternative Training and Development

Abstract

Sub-Saharan Africa and Southern Africa in general have high rates of youth unemployment and even underemployment. Many of our governments, administrations and private corporations are perplexed and often run out of options with regards to providing training and up-skilling opportunities to the youth in general. This paper looks at the Artist Proof Studio (APS), an inventive and entrepreneurial print-making company, based in Johannesburg, South Africa. The APS provides learning opportunities for future artists and those in allied fields, through workplace training and experiential learning. They also provide for private patron and corporate partnerships through a series of seminars which are run weekly to equip students and associates with the necessary skills and knowledge in areas including law, business and communications was envisaged to enhance and increase student understanding of future professional practice. Using the business model employed by the APS, the author proposes a similar business model for the development and training of future engineers, technicians and artisans that may be applied across the continent, considering the general conditions that may include under-employment, unemployment and poverty. The paper attempts to address critical issues such as funding for the training and up-skilling of such engineering personnel using the APS business model as a basis for innovation and entrepreneurship in the sector. Purposeful sampling was used to select a small group of individuals (students and administrators) that participated in the survey that highlights the workings of the APS business model. The survey entailed a brief questionnaire answered, telephonically and virtually. It is hoped that aspects of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the business operating model and the individuals affected may shed light on business processes and methods that could be applied elsewhere on the continent. The author has no affiliation to APS whether financially or otherwise, but does admire their pragmatic approach to developing young artists while promoting commercialization of art production on the continent, even under conditions of low economic growth and limited resources.

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Author Biography

Mark L Gordon, Gauteng Department of Health – Infrastructure Management Unit & UNISA – Department of Electrical and Mining Engineering, South Africa

Sub-Saharan Africa and Southern Africa in general have high rates of youth unemployment and even underemployment. Many of our governments, administrations and private corporations are perplexed and often run out of options with regards to providing training and up-skilling opportunities to the youth in general. This paper looks at the Artist Proof Studio (APS), an inventive and entrepreneurial print-making company, based in Johannesburg, South Africa. The APS provides learning opportunities for future artists and those in allied fields, through workplace training and experiential learning. They also provide for private patron and corporate partnerships through a series of seminars which are run weekly to equip students and associates with the necessary skills and knowledge in areas including law, business and communications was envisaged to enhance and increase student understanding of future professional practice. Using the business model employed by the APS, the author proposes a similar business model for the development and training of future engineers, technicians and artisans that may be applied across the continent, considering the general conditions that may include under-employment, unemployment and poverty. The paper attempts to address critical issues such as funding for the training and up-skilling of such engineering personnel using the APS business model as a basis for innovation and entrepreneurship in the sector. Purposeful sampling was used to select a small group of individuals (students and administrators) that participated in the survey that highlights the workings of the APS business model. The survey entailed a brief questionnaire answered, telephonically and virtually. It is hoped that aspects of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the business operating model and the individuals affected may shed light on business processes and methods that could be applied elsewhere on the continent. The author has no affiliation to APS whether financially or otherwise, but does admire their pragmatic approach to developing young artists while promoting commercialization of art production on the continent, even under conditions of low economic growth and limited resources.

References

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Artist Proof Studio, (APS). (2019). APS Annual Report. https.z/issuu.com/artistproofstudio/docs/annual_report _ -_ 2018-19.

Artist Proof Studio, (APS). (2021 ). Education sponsorship programme brochure. https://artistproofstudio.co.za/education.

Artist Proof Studio, (APS). (2021 ). Artist Proof Studio Online Store. https://artistproofstudio.co.za/

APS Administration Staffer. (2021 ). Telephonic communication on the topic of student training and office availability. Isle of Houghton, Gauteng, Republic of South Africa.

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Teale, F. (2000). Employment and unemployment in Sub-Saharan Africa: An overview. Centre for the Study of African Economies. University of Oxford. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/242096883 _ Employment_ and_Unemployment_ in_ Sub-Saharan_ Africa_ An_ Overview·
Published
2022-02-04
How to Cite
Gordon, M. (2022). The Artist Proof Studio as a Model for Training and Developing Africa’s Future Engineers, Technicians and Artisans. Africa Journal of Technical and Vocational Education and Training, 7(1), 76-83. Retrieved from http://afritvet.org/index.php/Afritvet/article/view/141